likeafieldmouse:

Justin Morin - Poison (2013)

rhamphotheca:

The Trouble With Turtles: Paleontology at a Crossroads

Scientists debate whether modern turtles are more closely related to snakes and lizards or birds and crocodiles.

by Naomi Lubick

Traditional paleontological research has been upended over the past few decades, as less traditional fields, such as genomics and developmental biology, have weighed in on vertebrate evolution. Researchers have examined the lingering color elements in dinosaur feathers, the genetics of woolly mammoths, purported proteins and blood from dinosaurs, and other ancient fossil signatures using modern tools. But the question of turtle evolution has remained resistant to both traditional and novel methods.

More than 300 species of turtles exist today, but where they came from isn’t entirely clear. Turtles are the last big living vertebrate group to be placed firmly on the tree of life, and the arguments are getting messy. Three fields in particular — paleontology, developmental biology and microbiology/genomics — disagree about how, and from what, turtles may have evolved.

Traditional paleontologists have placed turtles, which are indisputably reptiles, in relation to a group of mostly extinct reptilian animals called anapsids, which don’t have holes in their skulls; however, analyses in the 1990s put turtles in the diapsid camp, which originally had two holes in their skulls, and closer to modern reptiles like snakes. Morphology places them near the group made up of lizards and birds and crocodiles…

(read more: EARTH Magazine)

images: T - Kathleen Cantner, AGI.; Bottom 3 - Tyler Lyson, NMNH

(via scientificillustration)

First in a new series, tentatively called “Words never fail.”

Ellen Hodgkin, “I am going to make it,” graphite on paper, 2014

slcvisualresources:

Terry Winters - Double Gravityoil on linen - 1984203.2 x 264.2 cm (80 x 104 in)

slcvisualresources:

Terry Winters - Double Gravity
oil on linen - 1984
203.2 x 264.2 cm (80 x 104 in)

(via artistjournals)

Anonymous asked: Yo, White Supremacists have killed more Americans domestically in the last 13 years than Islamic terrorists. Clearly this means airports are gonna start screening white people primarily right?

yoisthisracist:

It doesn’t, our “national security” apparatus is a racist joke.

barricadeponine:

my parents definitely did not raise me to be a queer feminist filled with the wrath of a thousand enraged dragons and yet here i am

(Source: lesbianvenom, via heirtotheholyringsofbetazed)

feministdisney:

me and my cat decided that today I would be mad at some corporate things

nprbooks:

Latin American author Gabriel Garcia Marquez, who won the Nobel Prize in literature in 1982, died Thursday. He was 87. Garcia Marquez, the master of a style known as magic realism, was and remains Latin America’s best-known writer.
His novels were filled with miraculous and enchanting events and characters; love and madness; wars, politics, dreams and death. And everything he had written, Garcia Marquez once said, he knew or heard before he was 8 years old.
Chilean novelist Ariel Dorfman says Marquez’s Nobel Prize acceptance speech was one of the author’s most important messages to the world.
"Garcia Marquez is speaking about all the people who are marginal to history, who have not had a voice," Dorfman says. "He gives a voice to all those who died. He gives a voice to all those who are not born yet. He gives a voice to Latin America."
Read our full appreciation here.
Image via See Colombia

nprbooks:

Latin American author Gabriel Garcia Marquez, who won the Nobel Prize in literature in 1982, died Thursday. He was 87. Garcia Marquez, the master of a style known as magic realism, was and remains Latin America’s best-known writer.

His novels were filled with miraculous and enchanting events and characters; love and madness; wars, politics, dreams and death. And everything he had written, Garcia Marquez once said, he knew or heard before he was 8 years old.

Chilean novelist Ariel Dorfman says Marquez’s Nobel Prize acceptance speech was one of the author’s most important messages to the world.

"Garcia Marquez is speaking about all the people who are marginal to history, who have not had a voice," Dorfman says. "He gives a voice to all those who died. He gives a voice to all those who are not born yet. He gives a voice to Latin America."

Read our full appreciation here.

Image via See Colombia

(via npr)

andallaboutblue:

Joan Miró (1893-1983) This is the Color of My Dreams 1925

andallaboutblue:

Joan Miró (1893-1983)
This is the Color of My Dreams
1925

(via artistjournals)