likeafieldmouse:

Frank Hallam Day - Ship Hulls (published 2011)

"

As per my mother’s rule, I read all six of Addy’s books before being gifted the doll. But unlike Felicity’s, I didn’t often revisit them for pleasure. In my constant search for American historical fiction with protagonists of colour written for young readers, I often come across the same problem I did when I was younger: it’s all really depressing.

…White characters not only get a wider variety of books to choose from, but books in a wider variety of settings. Characters of colour in American hist-fic tend to exist strictly within certain boundaries of time or not at all. African-Americans exist within the boundaries of slavery, the Jim Crow South, or the Civil Rights movement. Native Americans exist in the mythical west until about 1870 or so, Asian-Americans exist during World War 2, only in the west (and only from Eastern countries), and I had to reach out to our followers to fill in the gaps my childhood reading material left when it came to Latin@s.

…This isn’t to encourage the erasure or minimalisation of the realities that people of colour have historically faced, but rather a desire for authors and publishers to realise that all of us existed in America outside the times of our most publicised oppressions. And that, even during the most difficult times, we still had lives that didn’t necessarily completely revolve around the overhead political themes of the day.

"

— Today on The R, Kendra’s talking young adult historical fiction and handing  out some book recs that might make history a little more enjoyable for young readers. (via racialicious)

unimpressedcats:

you’re trying to take a picture? let me ruin it for you !!!

npr:

Musical training doesn’t just improve your ear for music, it also helps your ear for speech. That’s the takeaway from an unusual new study published in The Journal of Neuroscience. Researchers found that kids who took music lessons for two years didn’t just get better at playing the trombone or violin. They found that playing music also helped kids’ brains process language.
This Is Your Brain. This Is Your Brain On Music
Photo credit: Annie Tritt for NPR

npr:

Musical training doesn’t just improve your ear for music, it also helps your ear for speech. That’s the takeaway from an unusual new study published in The Journal of Neuroscience. Researchers found that kids who took music lessons for two years didn’t just get better at playing the trombone or violin. They found that playing music also helped kids’ brains process language.

This Is Your Brain. This Is Your Brain On Music

Photo credit: Annie Tritt for NPR

onlylolgifs:

Pug goes crazy in his first ball pit!

nprmusic:

dynamofire:

luv u so much, monáe

Best. —Lars

fuckingfreezerpops:

Master has given Dobby a sock!

(via unimpressedcats)

nikolaecuza:

danosaurs-and-philions:

im a bad person who thinks bad thoughts like ‘ew what is that girl wearing’ and then remember that im supposed to be positive about all things and then think ‘no she can wear what she wants, fuck what other people say damn girl u look fabulous’ and im just a teeny bit hypocritical tbh

I was always taught by my mother, That the first thought that goes through your mind is what you have been conditioned to think. What you think next defines who you are.

(via sarahb)

socialworkgradstudents:

missknotty:

gameofreferences:

Michele Carragher, the head embroider on Game of Thrones, made this awesome tutorial to show how she created the dragonscale fabric that appears on several of Daenarys’ costumes in S3 and S4.

Ms. Carragher says that the dragonscale fabric was created because “In season 3 the Costume Designer Michele Clapton wanted a Dragonscale like textured embroidery that starts to emerge on three of Daenery’s costumes, which becomes heavier and more pronounced, growing and evolving as the season progresses” (Carragher).

In stages 9-11 of the tutorial we see how the textile evolves from lightly to heavily embellished. This progression is meant to illustrate Daenarys’ personal growth and the growth of her dragons (source).

Here’s a link to Ms. Carragher’s website.

WOW!

Don’t care about Game of Thrones but that shit is cool

(via heirtotheholyringsofbetazed)

"Sometimes, loving your body is not an option. Sometimes, the best we can do is accept our bodies as the changeable, beautiful, frustrating vessels they are. That’s OK. Expecting yourself to have a full-on love affair with your body at all times is asking too much. Bodies are occasionally annoying. What we can do is know them, and decide for ourselves when they feel good, and when they feel less good, and what we might do to make them feel better again. Even if we can’t love our bodies, we can make sure we don’t hate them."

— Lesley Kinzel (x)

(Source: thatquote, via feministquotes)